Viewing entries tagged
cemetery

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Kempton, Pennsylvania

I wrote about the adventure to Centralia last weekend. After Centralia, we briefly explored the town of Shamokin (which was NOT shamokin like Centralia was), another coal mining town in central PA. As we drove back to Philly, we took a slight detour to check out the very rural area of Kempton, near Hawk MountainSteve was sharing a spooky ghost story on the way there. Apparently, serial killer Matthias Schambacher and his wife had rented rooms in their house as a wayside inn to travelers. Rumors began to circulate that guests who had entered their house were never seen again.

Although his gravestone is now gone, Matthias Schambacher is buried in the supposedly haunted New Bethel Cemetery. We saw the general location of where he is buried, along with many other gravestones dating as far back as the mid-1700s on one side of the cemetery. The other side of the cemetery has recent gravestones and burials as recent as a few days prior to our visit.

The location of the cemetery was an absolutely stunning view from a hillside that overlooked the church and the valley. We were there at sunset and the weather seemed to make it a bit eerie, in my opinion…even though Steve kept trying to convince us that it was a peaceful place. Even a killdeer seemed be trying to give us a warning to leave the place. ghosts!!

 

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Laurel Hill Cemetery

One of my favorite locations to visit in Philadelphia is the historical Laurel Hill Cemetery. The cemetery, land of a former estate, was formed in 1836 and currently encompasses approximately 76 acres of land overlooking the Schuylkill River. The cemetery is divided into three sections that were each founded at different times during the site’s development. It also one of the few cemeteries in the country to be recognized as a National Historic Landmark. There are numerous noteworthy people buried in the cemetery, including General Meade and other Civil War era generals as well as local names such as Strawbridge, Elkins, and Rittenhouse.

I have found myself spending the most time in East Laurel Hill, which is the oldest part of the cemetery. I find it to be the most picturesque and captivating. I really like the old worn text and quotations and the carved statues and designs on the headstones. The stone on many of the headstones is weathered from age, which really creates some interesting designs.

It’s been about a year since I had last visited the cemetery so I decided to make a stop there today and snap off some photos. Today’s photos were mostly macros of the interesting weathered cracks that seem to form lifelike designs in the stone. I spent about an hour there, but probably could have stayed longer, which is unusual. Most of the time, I eventually start to get creeped out and feel the urge to leave. Fortunately there were many visitors there today so I didn’t feel so alone. Anyway, today I realized that some of the weathered cracks have taken on a resemblance of trees. Interesting.

 

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